Posts belonging to Category 'Supplies'

Wound Care Learning Resources at Hollister

*Information provided in this blog is not medical advice and is not intended to, and does not, replace the advice provided by your health care professional. Always seek advice from your licensed healthcare professional regarding any healthcare needs.

 

We have blogged in the past about specific wound care products that EB families may employ daily. As EB families bring others into their circle to support caregiving needs, they may need additional information for others who may be sharing in duties. Did you know that Hollister offers Wound Care Learning Resources for its wound and skin care products including informational demonstration videos at its website?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hollister line of wound care products has its own section of Wound & Skin Care Learning Resources dedicated to providing information for each product. For example, for families who might be using the Restore Contact Layer FLEX and Silver dressings, videos are available that not only explain Hollister’s TRIACT technology but also best use of the product. These videos also show products being applied and all related supplies or materials that may be used during the dressing process with that product.

 

In addition to online videos and product information, Hollister Wound Care also offers valuable tools to provide metrics to families as they evaluate products they are using and making decisions to adjust the supplies they use in their daily wound care process. The Wound & Skin Learning Resources section of the website includes such tools as the Pain Assessment Scale and the Wound Measuring Guide to help caregivers evaluate the dimensions of wounds being treated to select the right product and cut dressing materials properly.

 

If you or your family visit the site’s Learning Resources page and are unable to find your question answered, you can reach out directly to the team at Hollister by clicking here. But please note: you should always reach out directly to your physician with any questions specific to the care of your family member with EB. Getting as much information as you can to become as informed a caregiver as possible will ensure you have access to the most up-to-date knowledge about the disease and learn all that you can about the best treatment options available.

A Revamp of Hollister Online

 

Many of the parents I speak with are always on the lookout for the latest information about wound care products available to address their families’ needs. Understandably, they want to find whatever supplies will offer as much physical comfort as possible to their loved one facing EB. I often direct people to the Hollister Wound Care website to get additional information about wound care.

 

Recently, Hollister revamped its website (hollisterwoundcare.com) so I encourage members of our community to stop by should they have questions about any of Hollister’s EB-friendly products, such as its various Restore dressings featuring TRIACT technology, Endoform Dermal Template Dressing, as well as Restore Wound Cleanser and Restore DimethiCreme Skin Protectant. One of Hollister’s newest products that also may be of interest to EB families is the TRIACT Foam Dressing with Silicone Border, which can be another alternative for those people currently using foams with a silicone border or who already know they can tolerate border products.

 

The Hollister site features a special section devoted to offering educational materials called the Wound & Skin Care Learning Center, which includes videos and educational booklets to better demonstrate Hollister’s various product lines. The website also includes Educational Resources for Healthcare Professionals. This section is designed to offer additional support to those in the medical field who wish to stay as current as possible about the latest wound care technology and gain a greater understanding of the materials their patients and their caregivers may be using on a day-to-day basis.

 

If you have any questions at all about where to locate information on the website or about any of Hollister Wound Care’s EB-friendly product lines, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me with your questions. You can email me at leslie.rader@hollisterwoundcare.com. I’m happy to assist or direct you to the best person to help.

Caregiver Stress: What You Should Know

*The information provided in this blog is not medical advice and is not intended to, and does not, replace the advice provided by your health care professional. Always seek advice from your licensed healthcare professional in regards to your healthcare needs.

 

When we take care of others, it’s easy to forget to mindfully take care of ourselves. We’ve gathered some valuable information from helpful resources in the healthcare community to remind us of who can be most vulnerable to caregiver stress, what signs to look for, and what we can do to try to safeguard our own health and well-being from stress.

 

Who is at risk? The Mayo Clinic staff points out in a piece titled “Caregiver Stress: Tips for Taking Care of Yourself” that there are factors that can make us especially susceptible to stress as caregivers. Among these factors are the following: being female; living with the person we are caring for; social isolation; financial difficulties; higher number of hours spent caregiving; and lack of choice in being a caregiver.

 

According to The U.S. Office on Women’s Health, in its Caregiver Stress Fact Sheet, 61% of caregivers are women. I certainly see it on a regular basis myself out in the EB community and at events. I meet up with parents who have chosen to be their child’s primary caregiver, and often that parent is the mother. But let’s not forget that there are fathers who are primary caregivers, too, and they are also very susceptible to stress.

 

The U.S. Office on Women’s Health goes on to note that 59% of informal caregivers have jobs in addition to the time they invest in caring for another person. Due to their caregiving commitment, more than half of these employed women caregivers have adjusted their work schedule to either leave early, arrive late or reduce their hours. Making changes like that on top of the existing stress of the caregiving process can put added stress on an individual or her family already facing existing life balance challenges as well as the financial strain from mounting healthcare bills. Adding to that a possible decrease in income may only compound the stress for that caregiver.

 

So how can we identify the early signs of stress? In that same article, the Mayo Clinic notes the following indicators that stress may be settling in for you as a caregiver:

 

  • Feeling overwhelmed or constantly worried
  • Feeling tired much of the time
  • Too much or too little sleep
  • Gain or loss in weight
  • Easily irritated or angered
  • Loss of interest in activities we once enjoyed
  • Sadness
  • Frequent headaches, body pain or other physical ailments
  • Abuse of alcohol or drugs, including prescriptions

 

Many of these probably sound familiar to a lot of us but to a caregiver they can be a particularly dangerous red flag that stress has taken over because it is hard to care for someone else if we put our own health in jeopardy. We must get our own stress under control first and learn how to manage the challenges we face before we can be the steady, calm source of care and comfort as a caregiver to a loved one relying on us for support.

 

What can we do to better manage our stress as caregivers? WebMD offers some helpful suggestions in its article “Tips for Managing Caregiver Stress” of things you can do to help reduce or control stress levels. Relaxation methods like guided imagery, mind relaxation, deep breathing and biofeedback, among other techniques can strengthen the mind and body to weather the physical storm that stress can deliver to slow down or set back any caregiver, especially one trying to balance work outside the home with caregiving at home. And nothing tests our emotional fortitude like watching our children facing pain on a daily basis pain and trying to overcome their own physical and emotional challenges.

 

The greatest advice I would give any caregiver personally would be to ask for help. Sometimes we can be wary of asking others for even the smallest shred of support but there are people out here in the community, as families, healthcare professionals and those of us in the wound care field who may have witnessed and experienced EB from a number of vantages. We are all here to provide whatever guidance, comfort, answers or support we can. Never let the stress of caring for your loved one lead you to feeling isolated. You are not alone.

 

Wound Care Supplies

As new wound care supplies are developed, we’ve tried to use this blog as a means of educating families about different alternatives available. At Hollister Wound Care, we have a comprehensive line of wound care dressings that address different needs according to the severity of EB and other skin issues that may have resulted because of a diagnosis with epidermolysis bullosa. The list below is designed to offer a brief overview of the various kinds of dressings available through our wound care offerings at Hollister. More information is available at our website at www.hollisterwoundcare.com but if you have any other questions, you know you can always reach out to me directly at leslie.rader@hollisterwoundcare.com.

 

  • Restore Foam Dressings and LITE Foam Dressings
    Featuring TRIACT ADVANCED Technology, these super-absorbent dressings may be helpful for patients facing chronic wounds with light to heavy exudates (LITE foam dressings) and moderate to heavy exudates (standard foam dressings), as well as wounds with fragile surrounding skin. As exudate passes through a contact layer into the foam pad, the wound drains vertically and surrounding skin is protected from excessive softening. For more information about this wound care option, click here to learn about standard Foam Dressings and click here to learn about LITE Foam Dressings.

 

  • Restore Contact Layer FLEX Dressings
    With a flexible mesh and gentle tack to make it easier to apply to hard-to-wrap areas, these dressings incorporate TRIACT® Technology and are highly conformable. They are also non-adherent, ultra flexible and maintain a moist wound interface. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

  • Endoform Dermal Template
    Designed to deliver the strength of a dermal template with the simplicity of a collagen-based dressing, it is derived from an ovine (sheep) source and composed of 90% collagen and 10% intact, native extracellular matrix (ECM). The endoform dermal template demonstrates broad spectrum matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) reduction which may contribute to better wound healing. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

  • Restore Contact Layer Dressings and Contact Layer Dressings with Silver
    These dressings can be best used with low to moderate exuding wounds. Incorporating TRIACT technology and a non-adhesive, non-greasy surface, the dressings can be removed easily and virtually pain-free, which makes them suitable for wounds with fragile surrounding skin. An alternative featuring silver may be useful for reducing infection for wounds with low to moderate exudates as silver releases while the dressing absorbs the exudates. While early research indicates that continuous silver release may sustain antibacterial activity for up to seven days, patients should check with their doctor before using any product which contains silver sulfate. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

  • Restore Calcium Alginate Dressings and Restore Calcium Alginate Silver Dressings
    Offering a high absorbency and less residue than other calcium alginate dressings, these dressings may leave a cleaner surface area when removed than similar dressings available. Because of their advanced fiber makeup, they require less frequent changing, though patients should consult with their physician for guidelines. An optional version is available containing ionic silver complex which releases silver ions in the presence of wound fluid to fight odor and bacteria. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

Wound Care Supplies

 

*The information provided in this blog is not medical advice and is not intended to, and does not, replace the advice provided by your health care professional. Always seek advice from your licensed healthcare professional in regards to your healthcare needs.

 

Since we launched EB Resource over four years ago, we’ve set out to provide readers a forum where they could share stories through our blogs, interact with others on our Facebook and Twitter pages and learn across a myriad of different topics that may be of concern and interest to EB patients and their families. But for whatever reason our online community members keep coming back to this site, there is one thing that all EB families have in common, a critical component that is inevitable once a family receives a diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa. And that is wound care.

 

As both a member of the Hollister Wound Care team as well as President of the Board of Directors for DebRA of America and the lead person coordinating DebRA’s New Family Program, I help families try to better understand their wound care needs on a daily basis.

 

From time to time, we have featured different basic wound care dressings that make up the Hollister Wound Care family as they have been released and updated over the years but I thought perhaps it might be helpful to have a brief look at all of the main wound care materials within one blog. You can find additional information about each of them on the Hollister wound site and each item described below includes a link to that specific wound dressing’s information page on the site.

 

Endoform Dermal Template

Designed to deliver the strength of a dermal template with the simplicity of a collagen-based dressing, it is derived from an ovine (sheep) source and composed of 90% collagen and 10% intact, native extracellular matrix (ECM). The endoform dermal template demonstrates broad spectrum matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) reduction which may contribute to better wound healing. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

Restore Foam Dressings and LITE Foam Dressings

These super-absorbent dressings, which feature TRIACT ADVANCED Technology, may be helpful for patients facing chronic wounds with light to heavy exudates (LITE Foam dressings) and moderate to heavy exudates (standard Foam Dressings), as well as wounds with fragile surrounding skin. As exudates passes through a contact layer into the foam pad, the wound drains vertically and surrounding skin is protected from excessive softening. For more information about this wound care option, click here to learn about standard Foam Dressings and click here to learn about LITE Foam Dressings.

 

Restore Contact Layer FLEX Dressings

These dressings feature a flexible mesh and gentle tack to make it easier to apply them to hard-to-wrap areas. The dressings incorporate TRIACT® Technology and are highly conformable, non-adherent and ultra flexible, maintaining a moist wound interface. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

Restore Contact Layer Dressings and Contact Layer Dressings with Silver

These dressings can be best used with low to moderate exuding wounds. Because of its TRIACT technology and non-adhesive, non-greasy nature, the dressings can be removed easily and virtually pain-free, which makes them suitable for wounds with fragile surrounding skin. An alternative featuring silver may be useful for reducing infection for wounds with low to moderate exudates as silver releases while the dressing absorbs the exudates. While early research indicates that continuous silver release may sustain antibacterial activity for up to seven days, patients should check with their doctor before using any product which contains silver sulfate. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

Restore Calcium Alginate Dressings and Restore Calcium Alginate Silver Dressings

These unique dressings offer high absorbency and less residue than other calcium alginate dressings, leaving a cleaner surface area when removed than similar dressings available. Because of their advanced fiber makeup, they require less frequent changing, though patients should consult with their physician for guidelines. An optional version is available containing ionic silver complex which releases silver ions in the presence of wound fluid to fight odor and bacteria. For more information about this wound care option, click here.

 

Hollister Wound Supplies 101: Endoform dermal template

*The information provided in this blog is not medical advice and is not intended to, and does not, replace the advice provided by your health care professional. Always seek advice from your licensed healthcare professional in regards to your healthcare needs.

Hollister Wound Care recently announced its newest wound care offering, the Endoform dermal template. It has been designed to deliver the strength of a dermal template with the simplicity of a collagen-based dressing. It is derived from an ovine (sheep) source, and is composed of 90% collagen and 10% intact, native extracellular matrix (ECM).

We thought we’d take this time to answer a few basic questions about the new wound care alternative.

What is ECM?
An important element in living tissue is the ECM. It serves multiple functions, which include regulating intercellular communication and providing structural support to help tissue repair.

What benefits does the Endoform dermal template offer?
Endoform dermal template demonstrates broad spectrum matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) reduction, which we’ll discuss in more detail shortly. It is available to healthcare providers across the continuum of care.  It can be used to treat acute and chronic wounds and may be reimbursed under the collagen HCPCS A Codes. Another key advantage that it can offer EB families is its cost-effectiveness because re-applications can be made as little as once per week.

How is the collagen in Endoform dermal template different from collagen/ORC dressings?
Processed collagen//ORC dressings contain a denatured matrix structure. Endoform dermal template retains the structure and function of the native ECM. 

Why is broad-spectrum MMP reduction relevant?
Chronic wounds typically show high levels of certain MMPs. These MMPs can sequentially degrade the native ECM, delaying wound healing. To reduce excess MMP activity, collagen dressings provide a sacrificial substrate. Endoform dermal template demonstrates broad-spectrum MMP activity reduction. Reduced MMP activity may contribute to better wound healing.

If you would like more information about the Endoform dermal template, please contact me at leslie.rader@hollisterwoundcare.com.

Sources: EB Dressing Products, Hollister Wound Care

  • HCPCS Codes A6021, A6022 collagen dressing.
  • Negron L, Lun S, May BC. Ovine forestomach matrix biomaterial is a broad spectrum inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases and neutrophil elastase. Int Wound J. 2012 Nov 1.
  • Endoform Dermal Template Instructions for Use.
  • International consensus. Acellular matrices for the treatment of wounds. An expert working group review. London: Wounds International, 2010.
  • Medicare Local Coverage Determination (LCD) criteria requires the wound to have been present for a predetermined number of weeks and to have failed to respond to documented conservative measures prior to authorizing reimbursement on more advanced wound therapies such as skin substitutes. Number of weeks varies by region.
  • Lun S, Irvine SM, Johnson KD, Fisher NJ, Floden EW, Negron L, et al. A functional extracellular matrix biomaterial derived from ovine forestomach. Biomaterials 2010 Jun;31(16):4517-4529.
  • Schultz GS, Mast, BA, Molecular Analysis of the Environments of Healing and Chronic Wounds: Cytokines, Proteases, and Growth Factors. Primary Intention. February 1999.
  • Schultz GS, Ladwig G, Wysocki A. Extracellular matrix: review of its roles in acute and chronic wounds. World Wide Wounds. August 2005.

Deciphering Dressings

*The information provided in this blog is not medical advice and is not intended to, and does not replace, the advice provided by your healthcare professional. Always seek advice from your licensed healthcare professional in regards to your healthcare needs.

How do you know if you’ve picked the absolutely best wound dressing alternative? Sometimes, it can be difficult to choose medical supplies and know exactly which material is right for you. We’ve shared before criteria you may wish to use when selecting a wound dressing, but you may not be aware of the variety of dressing options available to you, just through the Hollister Wound Care family of products alone.

We’ve put together a quick and easy reference guide to our wound care products most commonly used by EB families. If you’d like to learn more about a particular dressing, just click on the name’s link for more details. 

Restore Contact Layer FLEX Dressings
Some of our most recently released dressings, they feature a flexible mesh and gentle tack to make it easier to apply them to hard-to-wrap areas. The dressings, which incorporate TRIACT® Technology, are highly conformable, non-adherent and ultra flexible, and they maintain a moist wound interface.

Restore Contact Layer Dressings
Contact Layer Dressings can be best used with low to moderate exuding wounds, and though most EB families change dressings daily or every other day, these particular dressings may be worn for up to seven days. It is always recommended that you follow the guidance of your physician with regard to frequency of dressing changes. Because of its TRIACT technology and non-adhesive, non-greasy nature, the dressings can be removed easily and virtually pain-free, which makes them suitable for wounds with fragile surrounding skin. An alternative dressing, Restore Contact Layer with Silver, may be useful for reducing infection for wounds with low to moderate exudates as silver releases while the dressing absorbs the exudates. Early research shows that continuous silver release may sustain antibacterial activity for up to seven days. However, patients should check with their doctor before using a product like this, which contains silver sulfate, to prevent any adverse reaction due to sensitivity or allergy.

Restore Foam Dressings and LITE Foam Dressings
These super-absorbent dressings, which now feature TRIACT ADVANCED Technology, may be helpful for patients facing chronic wounds with light to heavy exudate (LITE Foam Dressings.) and moderate to heavy exudate (standard Foam Dressings), as well as wounds with fragile surrounding skin. As exudate passes through a contact layer into the foam pad, the wound drains vertically and surrounding skin is protected from excessive softening. Unlike some other dressings that may need changing daily or every other day, these may be left in place up to 7 days depending on the nature of the wound and its healing status. Again, you should always consult your physician with regard to appropriate frequency of wound dressing changes. Another foam dressing alternative is the Restore Foam Dressing with Silver which may help reduce infection in wounds with moderate to heavy exudates. (As the exudate is absorbed into the dressing, silver is released. In vitro studies indicate that continuous silver release may sustain antibacterial activity for up to a week.) Individuals should not use if they are sensitive or could have an allergic reaction to a silver-lined dressing. 

Restore Calcium Alginate Dressings
These unique dressings offer high absorbency and less residue than other calcium alginate dressings, leaving a cleaner surface area when removed than similar dressings available. Because of their advanced fiber makeup, they require less frequent changing, though patients and caregivers should follow their physician’s guidelines. An optional dressing, Restore Calcium Alginate Silver, is also available and contains an ionic silver complex, which releases silver ions in the presence of wound fluid to fight odor and bacteria; however, individuals must use caution if they may be sensitive to or have an allergic reaction to this dressing with silver.

If you have any questions about these Hollister Wound Care products or about selecting a wound dressing in general, I’m always happy to help. Just email me at leslie.rader@hollisterwoundcare.com.